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Found 48 results

  1. News: FIGHT: OnePlus 5T

    With the announcement today of the OnePlus 5T, I decided to include it in the latest of our FIGHT: series of comparisons. So, without further ado, I give you the OnePlus 5T pitted against our three previous winners, the Sony ZX Premium, LG V30 and Samsung Galaxy Note 8. Comparing phones is always a somewhat emotive opinion on the part of the person doing the comparison, so I have tried to keep this one based upon facts rather than feelings. Some may argue with some of the decisions and some may need explanation. The winning phone in each category is shown in dark green and gains 2 points. Where no obvious winner exists, "highly commended" scores are in light green and gain 1 point) Feature One Plus 5T Sony ZX Premium LG V30 Galaxy Note 8 Construction Candybar, aluminium & glass Candybar, aluminium & glass Candybar, aluminium & glass Candybar, aluminium & glass Size 156.1mm x 75mm x 7.3mm 156mm x 77mm x 7.9mm 151.7mm x 75.4mm x 7.3mm 162.5mm x 74.8mm x 8.6mm Weight 162g 195g 158g 195g Screen Optic AMOLED 6.01" 2160x1080 401ppi IPS LCD 5.4" 3840x2160 807ppi P-OLED 6.0" 2800x1440 538ppi AMOLED 6.3" 2960x1440 521ppi Screen / Body Ratio 80.0 % 68.4 % 81.2 % 83.2 % Battery 3300 mAh 3230 mAh 3300 mAh 3300 mAh Processor Snapdraggon 835 Snapdraggon 835 Snapdraggon 835 Exynos OctaCore RAM 6GB / 8GB 4GB 4GB 6GB Storage 64GB / 128GB 64GB + MicroSD 64GB / 128GB + MicroSD 64GB / 128GB / 256GB + MicroSD Camera (rear) Main: 20Mpix f/1.7 & Wide: 16MPix f/1.7, OIS 19Mpix f/2.0, Predictive Phase Detection & Laser autofocus EIS, HDR, Panorama Main: 16Mpix f/1.6 (71deg)& Wide: 13Mpix f/1.9 (120deg), IOS, HDR10, Assisted Zoom Tele: 12Mpix f/2.4 (45deg) & Wide: DualPixel 12Mpix f/1.7 (77deg), IOS, 2x Optical zoom Camera (front) 16Mpix f/2.0 13Mpix f/2.0 5Mpix f/2.2 (90deg) 8Mpix f/1.7 Connectivity 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 2.0 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 3.1 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 3.1 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 3.1 Operating System Oxygen OS 4.7 (Android 7.1.1) Android 7.1.2 Android 7.1.1 Android 7.1.1 Biometrics / security Fingerprint (rear - middle) Fingerprint (side), face detection Fingerprint (rear - left), iris detection, face detection Fingerprint (rear - left), iris detection, face detection Protection None Waterproof (IP68) Waterproof (IP68), Shockproof Waterproof (IP68) Charging Dash Charge Fast Charging, Wireless Charging QuickCharge 3.0, Wireless Charging QuickCharge 3.0, Wireless Charging Price £ 499 £ 650 £ 799 £ 869 Availability Late November 2017 Now Now Now Total points 8 5 8 8 ...this newly altered scoring card has produced yet another set of mixed results. While the LG V30 and Samsung Galaxy Note 8 are still kings of the hill, the Sony ZX Premium has dropped back, and the OnePlus 5T has taken it's place. However, this is mainly due to it's impressive camera specifications; should the camera prove to not be as good in reality as it is in numbers (as has been experienced on the OnePlus 5), then we may need to revisit this comparison. As it stands right now, our new 2017 list of winners contains: LG V30 Samsung Galaxy Note 8 OnePlus 5T View full news
  2. FIGHT: OnePlus 5T

    Comparing phones is always a somewhat emotive opinion on the part of the person doing the comparison, so I have tried to keep this one based upon facts rather than feelings. Some may argue with some of the decisions and some may need explanation. The winning phone in each category is shown in dark green and gains 2 points. Where no obvious winner exists, "highly commended" scores are in light green and gain 1 point) Feature One Plus 5T Sony ZX Premium LG V30 Galaxy Note 8 Construction Candybar, aluminium & glass Candybar, aluminium & glass Candybar, aluminium & glass Candybar, aluminium & glass Size 156.1mm x 75mm x 7.3mm 156mm x 77mm x 7.9mm 151.7mm x 75.4mm x 7.3mm 162.5mm x 74.8mm x 8.6mm Weight 162g 195g 158g 195g Screen Optic AMOLED 6.01" 2160x1080 401ppi IPS LCD 5.4" 3840x2160 807ppi P-OLED 6.0" 2800x1440 538ppi AMOLED 6.3" 2960x1440 521ppi Screen / Body Ratio 80.0 % 68.4 % 81.2 % 83.2 % Battery 3300 mAh 3230 mAh 3300 mAh 3300 mAh Processor Snapdraggon 835 Snapdraggon 835 Snapdraggon 835 Exynos OctaCore RAM 6GB / 8GB 4GB 4GB 6GB Storage 64GB / 128GB 64GB + MicroSD 64GB / 128GB + MicroSD 64GB / 128GB / 256GB + MicroSD Camera (rear) Main: 20Mpix f/1.7 & Wide: 16MPix f/1.7, OIS 19Mpix f/2.0, Predictive Phase Detection & Laser autofocus EIS, HDR, Panorama Main: 16Mpix f/1.6 (71deg)& Wide: 13Mpix f/1.9 (120deg), IOS, HDR10, Assisted Zoom Tele: 12Mpix f/2.4 (45deg) & Wide: DualPixel 12Mpix f/1.7 (77deg), IOS, 2x Optical zoom Camera (front) 16Mpix f/2.0 13Mpix f/2.0 5Mpix f/2.2 (90deg) 8Mpix f/1.7 Connectivity 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 2.0 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 3.1 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 3.1 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 3.1 Operating System Oxygen OS 4.7 (Android 7.1.1) Android 7.1.2 Android 7.1.1 Android 7.1.1 Biometrics / security Fingerprint (rear - middle) Fingerprint (side), face detection Fingerprint (rear - left), iris detection, face detection Fingerprint (rear - left), iris detection, face detection Protection None Waterproof (IP68) Waterproof (IP68), Shockproof Waterproof (IP68) Charging Dash Charge Fast Charging, Wireless Charging QuickCharge 3.0, Wireless Charging QuickCharge 3.0, Wireless Charging Price £ 499 £ 650 £ 799 £ 869 Availability Late November 2017 Now Now Now Total points 8 5 8 8 ...this newly altered scoring card has produced yet another set of mixed results. While the LG V30 and Samsung Galaxy Note 8 are still kings of the hill, the Sony ZX Premium has dropped back, and the OnePlus 5T has taken it's place. However, this is mainly due to it's impressive camera specifications; should the camera prove to not be as good in reality as it is in numbers (as has been experienced on the OnePlus 5), then we may need to revisit this comparison. As it stands right now, our new 2017 list of winners contains: LG V30 Samsung Galaxy Note 8 OnePlus 5T
  3. In the fifth of our comparison articles, I've decided to compare the various flagship phones from all the major manufacturers. In this, part 1 of that fight, we have Google, Apple, LG & Samsung. The winner is quite interesting, (as is the outright looser), so read on to find out what the numbers tell us... Comparing phones is always a somewhat emotive opinion on the part of the person doing the comparison, so I have tried to keep this one based upon facts rather than feelings. Some may argue with some of the decisions and some may need explanation. The winning phone in each category is shown in dark green and gains 2 points. Where no obvious winner exists, "highly commended" scores are in light green and gain 1 point) Feature Google Pixel 2XL iPhone X LG V30 Galaxy Note 8 Construction Candybar, aluminium & glass Candybar,stainless steel & glass Candybar, aluminium & glass Candybar, aluminium & glass Size 157.9mm x 76.7mm x 7.9mm 143.6mm x 70.9mm x 7.7mm 151.7mm x 75.4mm x 7.3mm 162.5mm x 74.8mm x 8.6mm Weight 175g 174g 158g 195g Screen P-OLED 6.0" 2280x1440 538ppi AMOLED 5.8" 2436x1125 458ppi P-OLED 6.0" 2800x1440 538ppi AMOLED 6.3" 2960x1440 521ppi Screen / Body Ratio 76.4 % 82.9 % 81.2 % 83.2 % Battery 3520 mAh 2716 mAh 3300 mAh 3300 mAh Processor Snapdraggon 835 Apple A11 Bionic Snapdraggon 835 Exynos OctaCore RAM 4GB 3GB 4GB 6GB Storage 64GB /128GB 64GB / 256GB 64GB / 128GB + MicroSD 64GB / 128GB / 256GB + MicroSD Camera (rear) 12.2Mpix f/1.8, IOS, Phase Detection autofocus, HDR Dual 12Mpix f/1.8 & f/2.4, Phase Detection autofocus, IOS, 2x Optical zoom Main: 16Mpix f/1.6 (71deg)& Wide: 13Mpix f/1.9 (120deg), IOS, HDR10, Assisted Zoom Tele: 12Mpix f/2.4 (45deg) & Wide: DualPixel 12Mpix f/1.7 (77deg), IOS, 2x Optical zoom Camera (front) 8Mpix f/2.4 7Mpix f/2.2, HDR, panorama 5Mpix f/2.2 (90deg) 8Mpix f/1.7 Connectivity 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 3.1 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 2.0 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 3.1 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 3.1 Operating System Android 8.0 iOS 11.0.2 Android 7.1.2 Android 7.1.1 Biometrics / security Fingerprint (rear - middle), face detection Face ID Fingerprint (rear - middle), face detection Fingerprint (rear - left), iris detection, face detection Protection Waterproof (IP67) Waterproof (IP67) Waterproof (IP68), Shockproof Waterproof (IP68) Charging QuickCharge 3.0 Fast Charging, Wireless Charging QuickCharge 3.0, Wireless Charging QuickCharge 3.0, Wireless Charging Price £ 799 £ 999 £ 799 £ 869 Availability Now Now Now Now Total points 5 4 10 10 ...So there we have it; a newly altered scoring card produces a different result. Whereas the LG V30 had walked away with the "best phone" prize on our previous scoring matrix, now we've included screen / body ratio and a couple of other changes, the Samsung Galaxy Note 8 has jumped up to claim joint first place. See part 2 of this comparison for more of the 2017 flagship phones, and maybe a full on, definite winner... View full news
  4. Comparing phones is always a somewhat emotive opinion on the part of the person doing the comparison, so I have tried to keep this one based upon facts rather than feelings. Some may argue with some of the decisions and some may need explanation. The winning phone in each category is shown in dark green and gains 2 points. Where no obvious winner exists, "highly commended" scores are in light green and gain 1 point) Feature Google Pixel 2XL iPhone X LG V30 Galaxy Note 8 Construction Candybar, aluminium & glass Candybar,stainless steel & glass Candybar, aluminium & glass Candybar, aluminium & glass Size 157.9mm x 76.7mm x 7.9mm 143.6mm x 70.9mm x 7.7mm 151.7mm x 75.4mm x 7.3mm 162.5mm x 74.8mm x 8.6mm Weight 175g 174g 158g 195g Screen P-OLED 6.0" 2280x1440 538ppi AMOLED 5.8" 2436x1125 458ppi P-OLED 6.0" 2800x1440 538ppi AMOLED 6.3" 2960x1440 521ppi Screen / Body Ratio 76.4 % 82.9 % 81.2 % 83.2 % Battery 3520 mAh 2716 mAh 3300 mAh 3300 mAh Processor Snapdraggon 835 Apple A11 Bionic Snapdraggon 835 Exynos OctaCore RAM 4GB 3GB 4GB 6GB Storage 64GB /128GB 64GB / 256GB 64GB / 128GB + MicroSD 64GB / 128GB / 256GB + MicroSD Camera (rear) 12.2Mpix f/1.8, IOS, Phase Detection autofocus, HDR Dual 12Mpix f/1.8 & f/2.4, Phase Detection autofocus, IOS, 2x Optical zoom Main: 16Mpix f/1.6 (71deg)& Wide: 13Mpix f/1.9 (120deg), IOS, HDR10, Assisted Zoom Tele: 12Mpix f/2.4 (45deg) & Wide: DualPixel 12Mpix f/1.7 (77deg), IOS, 2x Optical zoom Camera (front) 8Mpix f/2.4 7Mpix f/2.2, HDR, panorama 5Mpix f/2.2 (90deg) 8Mpix f/1.7 Connectivity 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 3.1 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 2.0 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 3.1 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 3.1 Operating System Android 8.0 iOS 11.0.2 Android 7.1.2 Android 7.1.1 Biometrics / security Fingerprint (rear - middle), face detection Face ID Fingerprint (rear - middle), face detection Fingerprint (rear - left), iris detection, face detection Protection Waterproof (IP67) Waterproof (IP67) Waterproof (IP68), Shockproof Waterproof (IP68) Charging QuickCharge 3.0 Fast Charging, Wireless Charging QuickCharge 3.0, Wireless Charging QuickCharge 3.0, Wireless Charging Price £ 799 £ 999 £ 799 £ 869 Availability Now Now Now Now Total points 5 4 10 10 ...So there we have it; a newly altered scoring card produces a different result. Whereas the LG V30 had walked away with the "best phone" prize on our previous scoring matrix, now we've included screen / body ratio and a couple of other changes, the Samsung Galaxy Note 8 has jumped up to claim joint first place. See part 2 of this comparison for more of the 2017 flagship phones, and maybe a full on, definite winner...
  5. In the fourth of our comparison articles, I've compared the newly announced Hauwei Note 10 and Note 10 Pro to our (OK, my) old favourite the LG V30 and the "king" of Samsungs, the Galaxy Note 8. Comparing phones is always a somewhat emotive opinion on the part of the person doing the comparison, so I have tried to keep this one based upon facts rather than feelings. Some may argue with some of the decisions and some may need explanation. The winning phone in each category is shown in dark green and gains 2 points. Where no obvious winner exists, "highly commended" scores are in light green and gain 1 point) Feature Huawei Mate 10 Pro Huawei Mate 10 LG V30 Galaxy Note 8 Construction Candybar, aluminium & glass Candybar, aluminium & glass Candybar, aluminium & glass Candybar, aluminium & glass Size 154.2mm x 74.5mm x 7.9mm 150.5mm x 77.8mm x 8.2mm 151.7mm x 75.4mm x 7.3mm 162.5mm x 74.8mm x 8.6mm Weight 178g 186g 158g 195g Screen AMOLED 6.0" 2160x1080 402ppi IPS LCD 5.9" 2560x1440 499ppi AMOLED 6.0" 2800x1440 537ppi AMOLED 6.3" 2960x1440 521ppi Screen / Body Ratio 80.9 % 81.6 % 81.2 % 83.2 % Battery 4000 mAh 4000 mAh 3300 mAh 3300 mAh Processor Kirin 970 (AI Engine) Kirin 970 (AI Engine) Snapdraggon 835 Exynos OctaCore RAM 6GB 4GB 4GB 6GB Storage 128GB 64GB + MicroSD 64GB / 128GB + MicroSD 64GB / 128GB / 256GB + MicroSD Camera (rear) Main: 20Mpix f/1.6 & Wide: 12Mpix f/1.6, 2x Lossless Zoom, Leica optics, Phase Detection autofocus Main: 20Mpix f/1.6 & Wide: 12Mpix f/1.6, 2x Lossless Zoom, Leica optics, Phase Detection autofocus Main: 16Mpix f/1.6 (71deg)& Wide: 13Mpix f/1.9 (120deg), IOS, HDR10, Assisted Zoom Tele: 12Mpix f/2.4 (45deg) & Wide: DualPixel 12Mpix f/1.7 (77deg), IOS, 2x Optical zoom Camera (front) 8Mpix f/2.0 8Mpix f/2.0 5Mpix f/2.2 (90deg) 8Mpix f/1.7 Connectivity 3G, 4G, Gigabit LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 4.2, IR, USB 2.0 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 4.2, IR, USB 2.0 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 3.1 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 3.1 Android version Android 8.0 Android 8.0 Android 7.1.2 Android 7.1.1 Biometrics Fingerprint (rear - middle), face detection Fingerprint (front - middle), face detection Fingerprint (rear - middle), face detection Fingerprint (rear - left), iris detection, face detection Protection Splashproof (IP53) Waterproof (IP67) Waterproof (IP68), Shockproof Waterproof (IP68) Charging QuickCharge 3.0 QuickCharge 3.0 QuickCharge 3.0, Wireless Charging QuickCharge 3.0, Wireless Charging Price £ 799 £ 699 £ 799 £ 869 Availability November 2017 November 2017 Now Now Total points 5 4 10 10 From these figures, the Huawei phones can't quite match up with the latest from LG and Samsung; the V30 and Note 8 taking the top spot by some way. It's not all as bad as it looks though as camera quality is very hard to judge by numbers alone, and the only real let-down for the Huawei Mate 10 Pro are it's relatively poor waterproofing and lack of wireless charging. View full news
  6. FIGHT: Hauwei, LG, Samsung

    Comparing phones is always a somewhat emotive opinion on the part of the person doing the comparison, so I have tried to keep this one based upon facts rather than feelings. Some may argue with some of the decisions and some may need explanation. The winning phone in each category is shown in dark green and gains 2 points. Where no obvious winner exists, "highly commended" scores are in light green and gain 1 point) Feature Huawei Mate 10 Pro Huawei Mate 10 LG V30 Galaxy Note 8 Construction Candybar, aluminium & glass Candybar, aluminium & glass Candybar, aluminium & glass Candybar, aluminium & glass Size 154.2mm x 74.5mm x 7.9mm 150.5mm x 77.8mm x 8.2mm 151.7mm x 75.4mm x 7.3mm 162.5mm x 74.8mm x 8.6mm Weight 178g 186g 158g 195g Screen AMOLED 6.0" 2160x1080 402ppi IPS LCD 5.9" 2560x1440 499ppi AMOLED 6.0" 2800x1440 537ppi AMOLED 6.3" 2960x1440 521ppi Screen / Body Ratio 80.9 % 81.6 % 81.2 % 83.2 % Battery 4000 mAh 4000 mAh 3300 mAh 3300 mAh Processor Kirin 970 (AI Engine) Kirin 970 (AI Engine) Snapdraggon 835 Exynos OctaCore RAM 6GB 4GB 4GB 6GB Storage 128GB 64GB + MicroSD 64GB / 128GB + MicroSD 64GB / 128GB / 256GB + MicroSD Camera (rear) Main: 20Mpix f/1.6 & Wide: 12Mpix f/1.6, 2x Lossless Zoom, Leica optics, Phase Detection autofocus Main: 20Mpix f/1.6 & Wide: 12Mpix f/1.6, 2x Lossless Zoom, Leica optics, Phase Detection autofocus Main: 16Mpix f/1.6 (71deg)& Wide: 13Mpix f/1.9 (120deg), IOS, HDR10, Assisted Zoom Tele: 12Mpix f/2.4 (45deg) & Wide: DualPixel 12Mpix f/1.7 (77deg), IOS, 2x Optical zoom Camera (front) 8Mpix f/2.0 8Mpix f/2.0 5Mpix f/2.2 (90deg) 8Mpix f/1.7 Connectivity 3G, 4G, Gigabit LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 4.2, IR, USB 2.0 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 4.2, IR, USB 2.0 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 3.1 3G, 4G, LTE, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 3.1 Android version Android 8.0 Android 8.0 Android 7.1.2 Android 7.1.1 Biometrics Fingerprint (rear - middle), face detection Fingerprint (front - middle), face detection Fingerprint (rear - middle), face detection Fingerprint (rear - left), iris detection, face detection Protection Splashproof (IP53) Waterproof (IP67) Waterproof (IP68), Shockproof Waterproof (IP68) Charging QuickCharge 3.0 QuickCharge 3.0 QuickCharge 3.0, Wireless Charging QuickCharge 3.0, Wireless Charging Price £ 799 £ 699 £ 799 £ 869 Availability November 2017 November 2017 Now Now Total points 5 4 10 10 From these figures, the Huawei phones can't quite match up with the latest from LG and Samsung; the V30 and Note 8 taking the top spot by some way. It's not all as bad as it looks though as camera quality is very hard to judge by numbers alone, and the only real let-down for the Huawei Mate 10 Pro are it's relatively poor waterproofing and lack of wireless charging.
  7. The LG V30 thread

    LG are due to announce the V30 in just over a week's time, but they've already started leaking lots of info about it. So far we know that it's goign to have an 18:9 screen aspect ratio; a 6" display; no secondary display (unlike previous V series phones), but has a "floating bar" similar to Samsung's Edge panels); a f1.6 dual sensor camera; voice & facial unlock options; and apparently lots of new camera software features. Word is out on Quad-DAC, Wireless charging, processor, RAM and of course availability; but we'll find out more come IFA and the official unveiling. https://www.xda-developers.com/lg-v30-ux-6-0-floating-bar-graphy-cam/ http://www.lgnewsroom.com/2017/08/lg-v30-to-elevate-smartphone-camera-to-new-heights/
  8. Insider Preview build 16241

    The short answer is... not a lot of note. There are improvements to "Acrylic Material" (Micorosoft's new name for semi-transparency in the Windows UI), which make things slightly easier to live with, plus updates for Task Manager and Mixed Reality. However, the biggest changes this week relate to Delivery Optimisation. Microsoft are really going to town on this feature (to recap, this is where your PC can download updates from other Windows PCs on your LAN, or on the 'net if you allow, and equally act as a streaming host to other PCs, a-la P2P networks) and in this build have added a whole skew of controlls allowing you to choose how much bandwith should be available to Delivery Optimisation; to view your download and upload statistics, plus many other tweaks and settings for these features. There's also now a Windows Store item for installing Ubuntu on your Windows PC. I shit you not; MS are really into this Linux on Windows thing now, and reckon you should use their store *nix builds (other distributions are coming soon apparently) rather than trying to do the install yourself. It's actually quite a clever idea, as it keeps the uber-geeks happy that they can stare at a badly scaled text interface, while keeping the sysadmins happy that they're still supporting Windows as the underlying OS. Full release notes are avaialable here: https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/2017/07/13/announcing-windows-10-insider-preview-build-16241-pc-build-15230-mobile/#xMd5rXKSEdcpxrRq.97
  9. Comparing phones always a somewhat emotive opinion on the part of the person doing the comparison, so I have tried to keep this one based upon facts rather than feelings. Some may argue with some of the decissions and some may need explaination. For example, the S8 wins the screen category purely because it has the highest ppi (pixels per inch) rating; screen size has been ignored; and the G6 wins the rear camera category because the dual lens feature allows for more flexibility, even if the S8 / S8+ camera has a slightly better f stop rating. (the winning phone in each category is shown in dark green and gains 2 points. Where no obvious winner exists, or where the size of the S8+ is a contributing factor, "highly commended" scores are in light green and gain 1 point) Feature LG G6 Galaxy S8 Galaxy S8+ Construction Candybar, aluminium & glass Candybar, aluminium & glass Candybar, aluminium & glass Size 148.9mm x 71.9mm x 7.9mm 148.9mm x 68.1mm x 8.0mm 159.5mm x 73.4mm x 8.1mm Weight 163g 155g 173g Screen 5.7" 2880x1440 564ppi 5.8" 2960x1440 570ppi 6.2" 2960x1440 529ppi Battery 3300 mAh 3000 mAh 3500 mAh Processor Snapdraggon 821 Exynos OctaCore Exynos OctaCore RAM 4GB 4GB 4GB Storage 32GB + MicroSD 64GB + MicroSD 64GB + MicroSD Camera (rear) Dual 13Mpix f/2.4 (125deg) & f/1.8 (71deg), IOS, HDR10, AssistedZoom 12Mpix f/1.7 "dual pixel" IOS 12Mpix f/1.7 "dual pixel" IOS Camera (front) 5Mpix f/2.2 IOS 8Mpix f/1.7 IOS 8Mpix f/1.7 IOS Connectivity 3G, 4G, LTE 600Mb, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 4.1, USB 3.1 3G, 4G, LTE 1000Mb, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 3.1 3G, 4G, LTE 1000Mb, WiFi AC, NFC, GPS, Bt 5.0, USB 3.1 Android version Android 7.0 Android 7.0 Android 7.0 Fingerprint Sensor Yes, rear (middle) Yes, rear (left) Yes, rear (left) Protection Waterproof (IP68), Shockproof Waterproof (IP68) Waterproof (IP68) Charging QuickCharge 3.0 QuickCharge 3.0, Wireless Charging QuickCharge 3.0, Wireless Charging Price £ 649 £ 689 £ 779 Availability 27th April 2017 20th April 2017(pre-order delivery) 20th April 2017 (pre-order delivery) Total points 14 18 17 The table speaks for itself, with the highest score, the Samsung Galaxy S8 is the winner, narrowly beating it's larger brother, the Samsung Galaxy S8+.
  10. Has LG missed a trick?

    With Samsung out of the picture, LG rightly stole most of the press attention at MWC with the launch of their G6 handset, which, in the most part, is a very nice piece of kit. However, in order to fully capitalise on Samsung's delay, they needed to do one thing, do it well, and do it quickly... Get the phone into the hands of users before Samsung launched the S8. ... they didn't. At the time of writing (after Samsung have launched the S8, *and* anounced it's worldwide availability), we still don't know when a large number of key markets, including Europe, are going to get the G6 (and only in Korea is the phone currently available, leading to a huge number of grey import sales). Epic fail! The Samsung phone bests the LG phone in most ways, apart from ergonomics and the lovely Quad-DAC audio chipset in the Asia-only version of the G6. However, consumers are a fickle bunch, and if they could have gotten the G6 faster, before they knew when they'd have to stump up almost £700 for Samsung's latest, they would have forgone Quad-DAC and Wireless Charging (only available on US G6s), to have the latest phone in their hands. Overall, this is a massive mistake for LG. They had the world eating out of their palm and they missed it. Maybe they couldn't ramp production quickly enough, but if that were the case they should have run a pre-order system like Samsung and Apple do to keep the buzz going. If production quantities were not the issue and maybe the phone's variant models were the issue, LG should have scraped all that this-feature, that-feature crap and given the whole world the same phone, like Samsung do.* They didn't do that either. All I can say is... oops! *Samsung and others vary the frequencies in use for LTE and on some handsets add CDMA support, but mostly their specs stay the same for all world handsets. LG produce 3, 4 or 5 physically different variants of a phone, some missing feature A, some feature B etc.
  11. News: LG G6 launched

    LG have finally launched the much-leaked G6 at Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona. This handset has been subject to many leaks and teasers; indeed LG have virtually shown us the entire handset in a number of official teaser videos. So which of the rumoured specs are true, and which anticipated features didn't make it in to the final decive? The official specs are: Format: Candybar; non-modular aluminium sides & glass front & back construction Screen: 5.7" "FullVision" 18:9 QHD+ 2880x1440 564dpi Size: 148.9mm long x 71.9mm wide x 7.9mm deep Weight: 163g Battery: 3300 mAh (non-removable) Processor: Qualcomm SnapDragon 821 Cameras (main): Dual 13MP cameras (Wide angle: F2.4, 125 degree) (standard angle: F1.8, 71 degree) , supporting HDR10, SnapDragon processor assisted zoom, IOS 2.0 Camera (front): 5MP wide angle (F2.2, 100 degree) RAM: 4GB Storage: 32GB UFS2.0 internal storage, plus MicroSD slot Conectivity: 3G, 4G, LTE (600Mb download), WiFi, NFC, Bluetooth, USB 3.1 Android version: Nougat 7.0. Google Assistant included, which works even with the screen off (exclusive to the G6) Colour: 3 distinct colours, "signifying nature" - Ice Platinum; Mystic White & Astro Black Fingerprint sensor / power button: Rear, under the camera (as has been the style since the G2) Sound: DolbyVision Support built in, quad-DAC system as found in the V20 Games: $200 of Google Play in-game credit for 6 games in the "G6 Game Collection" Interface: LG UX6 - designed specifically to make use f the 18:9 screen, with two square (9:9) windows side by side, for example in the camera app as well as more obvious things like calendar Cooling: Heat pipes nestled inside the phone help to cool the processor Waterproofing: IP68 dust and waterproofing Charging: Qualcomm QuickCharge 3.0 View full news
  12. LG G6 launched

    The official specs are: Format: Candybar; non-modular aluminium sides & glass front & back construction Screen: 5.7" "FullVision" 18:9 QHD+ 2880x1440 564dpi Size: 148.9mm long x 71.9mm wide x 7.9mm deep Weight: 163g Battery: 3300 mAh (non-removable) Processor: Qualcomm SnapDragon 821 Cameras (main): Dual 13MP cameras (Wide angle: F2.4, 125 degree) (standard angle: F1.8, 71 degree) , supporting HDR10, SnapDragon processor assisted zoom, IOS 2.0 Camera (front): 5MP wide angle (F2.2, 100 degree) RAM: 4GB Storage: 32GB UFS2.0 internal storage, plus MicroSD slot Conectivity: 3G, 4G, LTE (600Mb download), WiFi, NFC, Bluetooth, USB 3.1 Android version: Nougat 7.0. Google Assistant included, which works even with the screen off (exclusive to the G6) Colour: 3 distinct colours, "signifying nature" - Ice Platinum; Mystic White & Astro Black Fingerprint sensor / power button: Rear, under the camera (as has been the style since the G2) Sound: DolbyVision Support built in, quad-DAC system as found in the V20 Games: $200 of Google Play in-game credit for 6 games in the "G6 Game Collection" Interface: LG UX6 - designed specifically to make use f the 18:9 screen, with two square (9:9) windows side by side, for example in the camera app as well as more obvious things like calendar Cooling: Heat pipes nestled inside the phone help to cool the processor Waterproofing: IP68 dust and waterproofing Charging: Qualcomm QuickCharge 3.0
  13. The LG G6 Thread

    Here's what we know so far (or at least believe we know) about the LG G6 (due to be announced on Sunday 26th Feb) Battery: 4200 mAh (non-removable) Features: Corning Gorilla Glass 5, 4G LTE, Bluetooth 4.0, fingerprint scanner, wireless charging, rapid charging, waterproof, stylus, full metal body Camera Features: Optical image stabilization plus, Dual LED, geo tagging, facial recognition, 3D front and back camera element, auto laser focus Camera – Front: 12 Megapixels Camera – Rear: 24 13 Megapixels + 24 13 Megapixels (dual cameras) Memory: 32, 64, and 128 GB internal memory and expandable to 128 GB with micro SD card Processor: Snapdragon 821 RAM: 6 GB RAM Screen Display: 5.5” 5.7" 4K? (1440 x 2280) 564dpi 18:9 display
  14. The demise of 3D televisions

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-38778244 I never knew Samsung had stopped production of 3D televisions. Sony and LG to follow. I was always terribly cynical of 3D in general, especially at home but our Samsung UE55H7000 is brilliant for 3D with the active glasses. The Martian, Avatar and the adventures of Tin Tin are all must sees in 3D. I can see why it never caught on however with the right TV it really does work well.
  15. Just to make you all aware of a situation I have recently experienced with LG UK. I bought a second hand G3 from Steve on the forum which required repair so I contacted LG. The whole situation surrounding the repair (and the hundreds of ways they tried to avoid their obligations) would take days to explain and I'm not going to bore you ..... but the main thing I picked up from this is that their manufacturers warranty is only valid for the original purchaser of the device. I would have thought their obligation for warranty would be for 12 or 24 months as standard, but unless you can expressly provide proof of purchase with it stating you as the original owner they will instantly tell you to get lost. I contacted trading standards who told me that if it states in their warranty terms that you have to be the original owner then thet's legal and they can deny a repair. Personally I think that's bollox as the device should be covered for faults for a certain period of time irrespective of who owns it. I thought I would mention this as many people buy "new" unopened handsets which were unwanted upgrades etc. from eBay and I bet they don't know even a new handset technically has no warranty. Would be interesting to find out if any other handset manufacturers have a similar policy. P.S. LG UK are the worst company I have ever dealt with by a long margin. Please preserve your sanity by avoiding them like the plague.
  16. Whilst LG is leading the push towards OLED TVs, they haven't forgotten about the humble LCD. LG today announced that they will be using Quantum Dot Technology on their upcoming 4K LCD TVs to improve colour reproduction. .Quantum Dot technology uses similar technology already used by Sony. Nano Crystals (2 to 10 nanometres!) are added to a film infront of the LCD backlighting. This provides up to 30% improved colour accuracy and wider viewing angles. Expect to see new 4k Ultra HD TVs this January at CES. We can't wait! Click here to view the news
  17. LG Makes Dots More Colourful

    Quantum Dot technology uses similar technology already used by Sony. Nano Crystals (2 to 10 nanometres!) are added to a film infront of the LCD backlighting. This provides up to 30% improved colour accuracy and wider viewing angles. Expect to see new 4k Ultra HD TVs this January at CES. We can't wait!
  18. In what some might think an unusual move, LG have become the first major handset manufacturer to release a Lollipop upgrade for one of their existing phone models.LG chose Poland as the first country to receive their Lollipop build for the G3, probably because they have a large software team based there. Luckily, due to the way LG customise their firmwares, the currently available build (the latest at the time of writing being build V20a) works perfectly well on any other European specification (D855) G3 phones. More information, including a review of Lollipop on the G3, will follow shortly. Click here to view the news
  19. LG chose Poland as the first country to receive their Lollipop build for the G3, probably because they have a large software team based there. Luckily, due to the way LG customise their firmwares, the currently available build (the latest at the time of writing being build V20a) works perfectly well on any other European specification (D855) G3 phones. More information, including a review of Lollipop on the G3, will follow shortly.
  20. It may come as a surprise to some, that although LG is one of the biggest mobile handset manufacturers in the world, it's always opted to buy it's processors from other companies (mostly Qualcomm). That's all about to change. Here's some info from LG: Whilst we certainly welcome LG entering the processor market (more competition is always good) we do have some questions too. [*]Wouldn't it have been simpler to have bought Broadcom and all it's expertise whilst it was for sale, rather than start from scratch? [*]Will LG start making processor for third parties like Samsung does? [*]Speaking of Samsung, doesn't their Korean rival's current issues show the possible weakness in this strategy? Things are great as long as you keep selling more and more handsets. The company saves money, and can be freer to create tailor made processors for it's handsets. But. If handset sales dip for any reason, the company would be left holding a very expensive manufacturing facility which will bleed money. It's a shame the new handset will only be available in Korea, but I'm sure it won't be long before we start LG's new processors popping up in flagship handsets here. Click here to view the news
  21. Here's some info from LG: Whilst we certainly welcome LG entering the processor market (more competition is always good) we do have some questions too. Wouldn't it have been simpler to have bought Broadcom and all it's expertise whilst it was for sale, rather than start from scratch? Will LG start making processor for third parties like Samsung does? Speaking of Samsung, doesn't their Korean rival's current issues show the possible weakness in this strategy? Things are great as long as you keep selling more and more handsets. The company saves money, and can be freer to create tailor made processors for it's handsets. But. If handset sales dip for any reason, the company would be left holding a very expensive manufacturing facility which will bleed money. It's a shame the new handset will only be available in Korea, but I'm sure it won't be long before we start LG's new processors popping up in flagship handsets here.
  22. LG remain the only mainstream manufacturer launching OLED TVs. But up until now, prices remained stubbornly high. LG have now announced the launch of the 1080p LG EC930V. Click here for more info. Click here to view the news
  23. Click here for more info.
  24. News: LG G3 Review

    LG has always been a bit of a sleeping giant to most people. Whilst many of their handsets such as the G2 were praised by people on this site, and developed a bit of a cult following, that never really translated into sales. Flagship handsets from Samsung, Sony and HTC tended to capture the Public’s attention far more. LG have been hoping they finally change that story with the G3, which was launched a couple of months ago. So, what is it like? .Build The G3 comes with two storage options, 16GB and 32GB (microSD expandable to 128GB). It also comes in black, gold or white. LG has aimed to give this a premium feel with a brushed metal effect rear. This plastic cover is removable, as it the 3000 mAh battery. It feels remarkably small for a device with a 5.5” screen. In fact, the screen is one of the key points LG is proud of. It’s the first handset with a QHD (2560x1440) screen. It also has a 13MP rear camera, 2.1 MP front camera and dual tone flash on the rear. All this is powered by a Snapdragon 801 processor and 2GB or 3GB RAM (32GB version has the more memory). Also, unusually, it has a laser focussing system for it’s rear camera. Some people have complained about the plastic rear, but I find it comfortable and solid. It doesn’t have the same level of premium feel as some of it’s competitors which have solid bodies, but it doesn’t feel cheap like some of it’s competitors which use plastic either. One frustration for me though is the sim card slot. It uses a micro sim and is so awkwardly positioned, that it’s a snug fit, meaning that using a nano sim and adaptor is all but impossible. If, you’re like me, and regularly swapping phones, this is a major pain. The phone feels firmly planted in the hand, with a good weight distribution. It’s relatively light at 149g, and feels reassuringly solid. Uniquely, on the back, it has the home and volume buttons which are surprisingly easy to use. I wouldn’t be surprised to find other manufacturers copying this idea in future, and in fact, as handsets become bigger, I highly recommend that they do. Some people have complained that it’s too big to use one handed, and therefore describe this as a phablet. Whilst it does have a large 5.5” screen, it also has very small bezels and I found it easy to operate with one hand, despite my modest hand size. Software LG have tended to follow Google’s design template, and along with the new icon design, and customisability of the interface, makes this a pleasant UI to use. There isn’t any extreme power saving mode, but the software feels modern, fresh and uncluttered. LG do have a couple of unique software features though. KnockON switches the handset on if you double tap the screen, and KnockCode allows you to unlock your phone by tapping a pattern onto the lockscreen. LG didn’t invent either feature, but they’ve implemented it well, and I’ve found myself instinctively tapping my other phones when wanting to use them! Along with the buttons on the rear, it shows that LG must be doing something right when I miss these features from other phones. Saying that. I did find that KnockCode didn’t work for me every time, and I did have to repeat my code more carefully from time to time. Performance I’ll get the easy bits out of the way first. The LTE / dual band 802.11ac WiFi antennas both worked fine. I couldn’t spot any issues. I got a firm lock on signals and everything worked fine. Battery life, on the other hand, was not the best. I kept on hearing how the G3 had great battery life, but I can’t repeat it. With heavy usage, I find that it just about lasted from morning until bed time. At a push, I might be able to get 24 hours usage on it, but I found myself putting the phone to charge when I got home in the evening. Speaking of which, the phone also supports Qi wireless charging, which is a great feature which I hope is built into more and more handsets. Part of the problem with the battery might be down to the display. As I mentioned before, it has a 5.5” QHD (2560x1440) screen. That’s a lot of pixels it needs to illuminate and despite having a respectably large battery, I think the phone suffers. That would be understandable though if the 534ppi display offered something special. It doesn’t. I remember the leap from 720p to 1080p displays in mobiles, and knew I’d never go back. I can’t see much, if any, improvement in having greater detail on the screen. What I can see though is the screen is dim, so it becomes difficult to use in sunlight. It also has poor contrast, so blacks aren’t so well defined, and colours tend to be oversaturated, and viewing angles aren’t the best Given I’ve not been able to appreciate any benefit in the 1440p screen, but I can see the problems compared to many 1080p screens, and feel that it also has a knock on effect with battery life, I wish LG had stuck with a high quality 1080p screen. I do also wonder what may have been if LG had been more patient and fitted in a Snapdragon 805 processor, which required less energy, but provided more power. This might have turned the phone into a 24 hour device and prevented the occasional lag between touches and responses. Camera The rear 13MP camera offers modest specs, but does an admirable job in most situations. It’s never class leading, but doesn’t do badly, except in low light, where the ISO bumps up, processing then smudges all the dots, to make it pretty poor. Otherwise, the camera is very good. It offers excellent levels of detail, and also has a very good Optical Image Stabiliser on it which works in all three dimensions. This does help guarantee better photos, as does the phone’s laser autofocus system. It offers two advantages. Firstly it makes focus times lightning fast, and secondly, it really helps the camera focus accurately in low light situations. I found these both particularly good compared to competitors when recording video. Oh. This can record 4K video too. Other points worth mentioning include the dual tone flash. It does help provide a more natural light, compared to white flashes, and means photos are less bleached. The front facing camera is also very good. At 2.1MP, it doesn’t win a specs race, but it does offer good selfie pictures, which can be activated using gesture control. This is a handy feature when taking group shots at full arms length. The front facing light also helps take selfies in low light situations. It’s also worth noting that LG have made a great effort to declutter the camera interface. Nearly everything is hidden, and requires additional touches to dig into the variety of options. Some people will like this, and some won’t. Auto-setting photos are pretty good though. Summary It’s admirable to see LG take customer feedback from the G2 on board and change things. The battery has become replaceable, build quality has improved and a microSD slot is included. LG have also looked to push the boundaries by introducing the QHD display and laser focussing system. There’s a lot to like here, but it falls short of becoming the perfect Android handset. The QHD display offers little improvement over a 1080p screen, but has a variety of downsides ranging from picture reproduction, to battery life. It also feels slightly underpowered on occasion. Saying that, it does offer a high level of detail on a large screen, making zooming redundant on a lot of web pages, and has a decent camera. It’s easy to use for such a large handset and sound quality is pretty good, but behind the class leader. Build quality is not class leading, but nor is it poor. In fact it’s very good. So. Would I buy one? Well. In my experience, there’s no such thing as the perfect handset. I know I’ve been critical of the display, and there’s nothing in the specs which is otherwise class leading, but I’ve enjoyed using it. Given you can pick one up for about £350, this makes it a bargain compared to other flagship devices, I would buy one, and hope that many other people do too. This handset deserves to do well. Click here to view the news
  25. LG G3 Review

    Build The G3 comes with two storage options, 16GB and 32GB (microSD expandable to 128GB). It also comes in black, gold or white. LG has aimed to give this a premium feel with a brushed metal effect rear. This plastic cover is removable, as it the 3000 mAh battery. It feels remarkably small for a device with a 5.5” screen. In fact, the screen is one of the key points LG is proud of. It’s the first handset with a QHD (2560x1440) screen. It also has a 13MP rear camera, 2.1 MP front camera and dual tone flash on the rear. All this is powered by a Snapdragon 801 processor and 2GB or 3GB RAM (32GB version has the more memory). Also, unusually, it has a laser focussing system for it’s rear camera. Some people have complained about the plastic rear, but I find it comfortable and solid. It doesn’t have the same level of premium feel as some of it’s competitors which have solid bodies, but it doesn’t feel cheap like some of it’s competitors which use plastic either. One frustration for me though is the sim card slot. It uses a micro sim and is so awkwardly positioned, that it’s a snug fit, meaning that using a nano sim and adaptor is all but impossible. If, you’re like me, and regularly swapping phones, this is a major pain. The phone feels firmly planted in the hand, with a good weight distribution. It’s relatively light at 149g, and feels reassuringly solid. Uniquely, on the back, it has the home and volume buttons which are surprisingly easy to use. I wouldn’t be surprised to find other manufacturers copying this idea in future, and in fact, as handsets become bigger, I highly recommend that they do. Some people have complained that it’s too big to use one handed, and therefore describe this as a phablet. Whilst it does have a large 5.5” screen, it also has very small bezels and I found it easy to operate with one hand, despite my modest hand size. Software LG have tended to follow Google’s design template, and along with the new icon design, and customisability of the interface, makes this a pleasant UI to use. There isn’t any extreme power saving mode, but the software feels modern, fresh and uncluttered. LG do have a couple of unique software features though. KnockON switches the handset on if you double tap the screen, and KnockCode allows you to unlock your phone by tapping a pattern onto the lockscreen. LG didn’t invent either feature, but they’ve implemented it well, and I’ve found myself instinctively tapping my other phones when wanting to use them! Along with the buttons on the rear, it shows that LG must be doing something right when I miss these features from other phones. Saying that. I did find that KnockCode didn’t work for me every time, and I did have to repeat my code more carefully from time to time. Performance I’ll get the easy bits out of the way first. The LTE / dual band 802.11ac WiFi antennas both worked fine. I couldn’t spot any issues. I got a firm lock on signals and everything worked fine. Battery life, on the other hand, was not the best. I kept on hearing how the G3 had great battery life, but I can’t repeat it. With heavy usage, I find that it just about lasted from morning until bed time. At a push, I might be able to get 24 hours usage on it, but I found myself putting the phone to charge when I got home in the evening. Speaking of which, the phone also supports Qi wireless charging, which is a great feature which I hope is built into more and more handsets. Part of the problem with the battery might be down to the display. As I mentioned before, it has a 5.5” QHD (2560x1440) screen. That’s a lot of pixels it needs to illuminate and despite having a respectably large battery, I think the phone suffers. That would be understandable though if the 534ppi display offered something special. It doesn’t. I remember the leap from 720p to 1080p displays in mobiles, and knew I’d never go back. I can’t see much, if any, improvement in having greater detail on the screen. What I can see though is the screen is dim, so it becomes difficult to use in sunlight. It also has poor contrast, so blacks aren’t so well defined, and colours tend to be oversaturated, and viewing angles aren’t the best Given I’ve not been able to appreciate any benefit in the 1440p screen, but I can see the problems compared to many 1080p screens, and feel that it also has a knock on effect with battery life, I wish LG had stuck with a high quality 1080p screen. I do also wonder what may have been if LG had been more patient and fitted in a Snapdragon 805 processor, which required less energy, but provided more power. This might have turned the phone into a 24 hour device and prevented the occasional lag between touches and responses. Camera The rear 13MP camera offers modest specs, but does an admirable job in most situations. It’s never class leading, but doesn’t do badly, except in low light, where the ISO bumps up, processing then smudges all the dots, to make it pretty poor. Otherwise, the camera is very good. It offers excellent levels of detail, and also has a very good Optical Image Stabiliser on it which works in all three dimensions. This does help guarantee better photos, as does the phone’s laser autofocus system. It offers two advantages. Firstly it makes focus times lightning fast, and secondly, it really helps the camera focus accurately in low light situations. I found these both particularly good compared to competitors when recording video. Oh. This can record 4K video too. Other points worth mentioning include the dual tone flash. It does help provide a more natural light, compared to white flashes, and means photos are less bleached. The front facing camera is also very good. At 2.1MP, it doesn’t win a specs race, but it does offer good selfie pictures, which can be activated using gesture control. This is a handy feature when taking group shots at full arms length. The front facing light also helps take selfies in low light situations. It’s also worth noting that LG have made a great effort to declutter the camera interface. Nearly everything is hidden, and requires additional touches to dig into the variety of options. Some people will like this, and some won’t. Auto-setting photos are pretty good though. Summary It’s admirable to see LG take customer feedback from the G2 on board and change things. The battery has become replaceable, build quality has improved and a microSD slot is included. LG have also looked to push the boundaries by introducing the QHD display and laser focussing system. There’s a lot to like here, but it falls short of becoming the perfect Android handset. The QHD display offers little improvement over a 1080p screen, but has a variety of downsides ranging from picture reproduction, to battery life. It also feels slightly underpowered on occasion. Saying that, it does offer a high level of detail on a large screen, making zooming redundant on a lot of web pages, and has a decent camera. It’s easy to use for such a large handset and sound quality is pretty good, but behind the class leader. Build quality is not class leading, but nor is it poor. In fact it’s very good. So. Would I buy one? Well. In my experience, there’s no such thing as the perfect handset. I know I’ve been critical of the display, and there’s nothing in the specs which is otherwise class leading, but I’ve enjoyed using it. Given you can pick one up for about £350, this makes it a bargain compared to other flagship devices, I would buy one, and hope that many other people do too. This handset deserves to do well.