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Found 109 results

  1. First news is that Microsoft have announced that LG, Lenovo and ZTE will, amongst others, become partners in making new handsets. So not everyone is abandoning them because of their purchase of Nokia. Maybe Google's partnership with Samsung has something to do with it.... Windows Phone 8.1 should also be available to those currently running 8.0. Amongst the announcements, they include support for a wider range of chipsets, dual sim (for developing markets) and also storage of apps on memory cards.
  2. The BBC has been keen to be seen as platform agnostic in the tech wars, and so it was surprising that they'd never released a version of iPlayer for Windows Phone. Now we know why.The Head of BBC's iPlayer responded to a query as to why there was no support with the following: "Hi [Redacted] Thanks for your mail. I'm adding [Redacted] -- who is the Head of iPlayer on my team -- in case he has anything to add. There are two ways we can go about bringing iPlayer to Windows Phone: 1. We can build a full app -- the kind you get in the Marketplace. This is completely bespoke to Windows Phone 7, and is the costliest option because Windows Phone uses technologies unlike those used on any other platform. While Android and Apple also use their own app technologies, the TV and radio programmes themselves can be created once and used across both, so much of the investment is reusable. Sadly this is not the case for Windows Phone. Unfortunately Microsoft have also announced that Windows Phone 8 apps will be different yet again, so any Windows Phone 7 app we make would have to be rebuilt from the ground up for the next version of Windows Phone. 2. We can encourage Windows Phone users to access our mobile web site by openingbbc.co.uk/iplayer from their phones. Unfortunately today there's a bug in Windows Phone that prevents our standards-based media from being played on those devices. Microsoft has been aware of the bug for over a year now, and we're hopeful they'll address it (on Windows Phone 7 as well as Windows Phone 8) so our Windows Phone audiences can access iPlayer. As you can see, there's no easy answer. I'm optimistic that one or both of the options above will become possible in Windows Phone 8, but that's little help to people like you who are using Windows Phone 7. Nonetheless, hopefully this additional detail helps you understand our thought process. Thanks again for reaching out. Daniel Danker General Manager Programmes & On Demand BBC" It looks like someone in Microsoft hasn't heard that this is a big deal. The only hope is that Windows Phone 8 changes things. Click here to view the article
  3. normal

    Wot no iPlayer for Windows Phone?

    The Head of BBC's iPlayer responded to a query as to why there was no support with the following: "Hi [Redacted] Thanks for your mail. I'm adding [Redacted] -- who is the Head of iPlayer on my team -- in case he has anything to add. There are two ways we can go about bringing iPlayer to Windows Phone: 1. We can build a full app -- the kind you get in the Marketplace. This is completely bespoke to Windows Phone 7, and is the costliest option because Windows Phone uses technologies unlike those used on any other platform. While Android and Apple also use their own app technologies, the TV and radio programmes themselves can be created once and used across both, so much of the investment is reusable. Sadly this is not the case for Windows Phone. Unfortunately Microsoft have also announced that Windows Phone 8 apps will be different yet again, so any Windows Phone 7 app we make would have to be rebuilt from the ground up for the next version of Windows Phone. 2. We can encourage Windows Phone users to access our mobile web site by openingbbc.co.uk/iplayer from their phones. Unfortunately today there's a bug in Windows Phone that prevents our standards-based media from being played on those devices. Microsoft has been aware of the bug for over a year now, and we're hopeful they'll address it (on Windows Phone 7 as well as Windows Phone 8) so our Windows Phone audiences can access iPlayer. As you can see, there's no easy answer. I'm optimistic that one or both of the options above will become possible in Windows Phone 8, but that's little help to people like you who are using Windows Phone 7. Nonetheless, hopefully this additional detail helps you understand our thought process. Thanks again for reaching out. Daniel Danker General Manager Programmes & On Demand BBC" It looks like someone in Microsoft hasn't heard that this is a big deal. The only hope is that Windows Phone 8 changes things.
  4. Gaming conference E3 starts next week and the hype / leak machine is starting to creak into action. It's rumoured that Microsoft will be launching a tablet called Smart Glass there.That may not be so interesting in itself, but the rest is! [*]Will allow users to control their Xbox 360 remotely. Will be available cross platform on multiple operating systems including Windows, Windows Phone, Android and iOS. [*]Applications will be accessible through the tablet. Such as Youtube/Netflix/Vemo ect. [*]Live streaming ability through the tablet to the TV, desktop, lap top and other devices. Microsoft have tried to steer away from other OS's, so more Xbox control and also available on rival OS's is potentially big news, but could make Xbox's more desirable than other console platforms. Source Click here to view the article
  5. That may not be so interesting in itself, but the rest is! Will allow users to control their Xbox 360 remotely. Will be available cross platform on multiple operating systems including Windows, Windows Phone, Android and iOS. Applications will be accessible through the tablet. Such as Youtube/Netflix/Vemo ect. Live streaming ability through the tablet to the TV, desktop, lap top and other devices. Microsoft have tried to steer away from other OS's, so more Xbox control and also available on rival OS's is potentially big news, but could make Xbox's more desirable than other console platforms. Source
  6. Mozilla is claiming the Microsoft has locked out third party developer browsers from Windows 8 machines using ARM processors.ARM processors are very popular amongst tablet and mobile manufacturers, and Mozilla's claim that Microsoft is excluding rivals to Internet Explorer from accessing the same level of access privileges, and so won't be able to offer as many features which people take for granted in browsers these days. Both Mozilla's Firefox and Google's Chrome have made major inroads into Internet Explorer's dominance and both companies can be certain to legally challenge the situation if correct, and Microsoft remain reluctant to change things. More details Click here to view the article
  7. ARM processors are very popular amongst tablet and mobile manufacturers, and Mozilla's claim that Microsoft is excluding rivals to Internet Explorer from accessing the same level of access privileges, and so won't be able to offer as many features which people take for granted in browsers these days. Both Mozilla's Firefox and Google's Chrome have made major inroads into Internet Explorer's dominance and both companies can be certain to legally challenge the situation if correct, and Microsoft remain reluctant to change things. More details